Big News for Renters: The Supreme Court gave advice to the people living on rent, said a big thing, know in details

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Big News for Renters: The Supreme Court gave advice to the people living on rent, said a big thing, know in details
Big News for Renters: The Supreme Court gave advice to the people living on rent, said a big thing, know in details

With this new decision of the Supreme Court, it has once again become clear that the landlord is the real owner of a house. The Supreme Court has said a big thing while giving advice to the people living on rent. Let us know in detail in the news below.


The Supreme Court refused to give relief to a tenant who was reluctant to vacate the house, saying that those whose houses are made of glass, do not pelt stones at others.

With this decision of the Supreme Court, it has once again become clear that the landlord is the real owner of a house. No matter how many days a tenant stays in a house, he should not forget that he is only a tenant and not the owner of the house.

While hearing the case, a three-member bench headed by Justice Rohington F. Nariman refused to give any relief to the tenant Dinesh and ordered that he would have to vacate the premises. Along with this, the court also issued orders to pay the outstanding rent to the tenant Dinesh at the earliest.


Tenant’s lawyer Dushyant Parashar told the bench that he should be given time to deposit the outstanding rent amount. On this, the court flatly refused to give extension to the tenant. The court said that the way you have harassed the landlord in this matter, after that the court cannot give any kind of relief. You will also have to vacate the premises and pay the rent immediately.

In fact, the tenant had not paid the rent to the landlord for almost three years, nor was he in favor of vacating the shop. Eventually the shop owner approached the court. The lower court had asked the tenant not only to pay the outstanding rent but also to vacate the shop within two months. Along with this, it was also asked to pay rent of 35 thousand per month from the filing of the suit till the vacation of the premises. Even after this, the tenant did not obey the order of the court.

In January last year, the Madhya Pradesh High Court had given four months time to the tenant to deposit about nine lakh rupees, but the tenant did not comply with that order as well. After this, the tenant reached the Supreme Court, from where orders were issued to vacate the shop immediately, rejecting his petition.